Make it Monday: from Ikea tray to farmhouse art

Make it Monday: from Ikea tray to farmhouse art

Last year, my mom gave me this cute Ikea tray. I immediately loved the lace like pattern on the outer edges.

I used it as the base of an advent wreath, and for awhile, I used it in my coffee bar. I toyed with making a chalkboard out of it, but decided I wanted to create something a little less permanent.

I got the bright idea to create something using the Silhouette Cameo. Since I was a “noob” at the time and didn’t know what I was doing, some sweet friends of mine walked me through. Thanks, Katy, Kim, Leslie and anyone I may have forgotten 😉

I settled on a simple brush script font and a laurel wreath pattern. When I was done, I had this:

It’s cute, simple, and best of all, if I get tired of it, I can peel it off and do something different. What do you think?

What Silhouette or Cricut crafts have you done lately?

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How to style your coffee table

How to style your coffee table

how to style coffee table

We have only recently gotten a coffee table. Our living room at the old house was too small for one, but in the four-and-a-half years we’ve lived here, we’ve never bought one. My first impulse was to buy one that matched our console table and end tables, but then I decided to buy one that coordinated with them instead. I wanted something a little on the cheap side, too, since the kids are still small.

I finally decided on an industrial farmhouse style coffee table with a second shelf for storing baskets.

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Except now, what’s a girl to do with the top of the coffee table?

1. Anchor your collected items with a tray or shallow basket.

coffee table

I used this cute tray I bought in the Target Dollar Spot last summer. It is small, so it works perfectly for our small coffee table. I added some burlap-covered books for texture, a faux boxwood plant for greenery and height, and a candlestick for height, which brings me to my next tip.

2. Include natural elements for interest

I love the outdoors, and I love bringing a little nature into our home. What I also love is decorating with some sort of natural element, be it pinecones, florals, or greenery. The boxwood adds color and a little life to the table.

3. Height keeps the eye moving

Displaying your decor at different heights makes each item stand out, but it also keeps things interesting, since it draws the eyes to continue moving. Use a stack of books or a small stand to add height to a smaller object, or use pedastal dishes, candlesticks, or flower pots with a base.

4. Add a stack of books or magazines on the opposite side of the table to balance out the tray.

I chose to use two books, a recipe book about Sunday dinners, and a book about Labrador retrievers. I am a believer in decorating with things that make you happy. Sunday dinners evoke happy memories for me, and the Lab book is a nod to our “fur son,” a 12-year-old Yellow Lab named Bear.

living room 2

The bottom shelf houses a large basket for hiding unsightly but necessary things, like coasters and a spare blanket. The side opposite the basket holds a stack of magazines.

living room

I hope you’ve enjoyed these tips for decorating your coffee table. How is your coffee table decorated? Comment below with a picture- I’d love to see your coffee table!

Have a wonderful day.

Creating captain’s mirrors from cake pans

Creating captain’s mirrors from cake pans

captains mirrors

I recently went on a search for captain’s mirrors to hang above our new hallway console table. However, a recent Google search proved that captain’s mirrors are typically expensive.

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I began to wonder how I could create my own captain’s mirror. I tried to make one from a stove eye cover, but it was too flimsy and not deep enough.

I decided to try to make one from a round cake pan. To create your own captain’s mirror my way, you will need the following:

2 10-inch round cake pans

2 9-inch beveled edge mirrors

1-inch blocks of wood (four per mirror)

3/4 inch machine screws

Cardboard cut in a circle the same size as the cake pan

D-rings with screws

twine or an old leather belt (your choice. I used twine)

My cake pans were just basic round pans. They were super cheap. I began by drilling holes in the pans, and screwing the wood blocks where I wanted them with the machine screws.

cake pan mirror 2

I attached the D-rings to the sides of the pan with the machine screws.

d rings

Then, I attached the cardboard round to the pan by screwing it to the wood blocks.

cardboard mirror

I then painted the cardboard black and allowed it to dry. Next, I attached the mirror with all-purpose adhesive. I attached jute twine to the D-rings, but you could use leather, a chain, or whatever strikes your fancy. I also ended up painting the rest of the pans black with some chalk paint, which I then antiqued.

console 2

console

I think that added a lot of character to these mirrors.  Now they are fancying up our otherwise boring hallway.

What could you do with re-purposed cake pans? I bet the possiblities are endless.

 

 

Make a tiered tray from stove eye covers

tiered trays

 It all started when I visited my aunt a few weeks ago. I casually mentioned wanting to make something from stove eye covers, but having a ceramic topped stove, I have not had stove eye covers for quite some time.
As luck would have it, my aunt had some stove eye covers she wanted to get rid of.
I gave those bad boys a coat of silver paint, got some cheap wooden candlesticks, and some all-purpose adhesive.
tiered tray needs
I then decided exactly where I wanted those candlesticks to be positioned, and I made it happen. You literally just glue the candlesticks to the eye covers- it’s that easy. Although, you may want to use some screws to secure the candlesticks and make the tray a little more stable.
candlestick tray
After the glue dried, I popped this little tiered tray into our hall bath and put it to good use!
organized &
I’m not done with this yet, but I love how it’s helping curb the clutter in our hall bath.  A versatile, cute tiered tray for very little money.
What have you repurposed lately?

 

2018 Winter Home Tour

2018 Winter Home Tour

2018 winter home tour

 

My home always feels so naked and so bare after Christmas time. We do so much decorating for Christmas that I feel like our home needs an opportunity to breathe when we take it all down.

For this reason, I like to keep my winter decorating very simple and natural. I even reuse some of my Christmas decorations, and since I’d rather decorate for seasons rather than holidays, I can leave all of it up until Spring.

Today, I’d like to share our simple, yet elegant farmhouse winter home tour. Basically, I’ve taken my favorite things about Christmas decor and incorporated them into our winter decor.

1. Candlelight and evergreens

winter vignette 2

One of the best ways to decorate for winter is to keep it natural. Here, I’ve used some realistic evergreen floral picks with winterberry and pine cones to decorate our china hutch.  I picked these up a few years ago from a local craft store and I’ve used them every year for Christmas and winter. Candles remind me of Christmas lights, and they just make our home feel so cozy and comfortable.

dining room sideboard

Also on our china hutch: some red berry sprigs and a red berry wreath. The berries match the red in our winterberry, and they’re so versatile. I use them when we decorate for fall as well. There’s also a galvanized pail of “snowballs” as well.  I love incorporating sentimental items into my decor, and this stoneware pitcher belonged to my great grandmother. I love using it to show off these pretty floral picks.

winterberry

2. Lanterns add a cozy glow

faux mantle

red lantern

I love lanterns! If you’re familiar with my blog, you know we don’t have a mantle (stay tuned), so I decorate this pass through in our dining room as if it were a mantle. I continued our winterberry and evergreen in here, but I also added a terrarium, a pitcher with frosted berry picks, two lanterns with candles, and two small candle holders with fake snow on them.

winterberry pitcher

3. Natural elements go a long way

winter ht- pineconesFront Entry vignette

I love the outdoors, so it isn’t surprising that I love bringing the outdoors inside. Pine cones are versatile because you can use them to decorate for winter, spring, and fall. Either buy some pinecones from a craft store, or pick up your own. You can find realistic looking evergreens and berries pretty much anywhere. I use these year after year and I love how realistic they look. This vignette is brightening up our entry way.

wintervignettedining room

Our dining room table contains this vignette made from a Pepsi crate I found in the mountains last spring, a gallon jar with more evergreen picks, a milkglass bowl of pine cones, and a scale my grandmother gifted to me.

Well, folks, that wraps up our 2018 winter home tour. I hope you’ve enjoyed it!

How to use your vinyl cutter to create farmhouse wood signs

How to use your vinyl cutter to create farmhouse wood signs

Creating Pallet Signs

Wooden farmhouse signs are everywhere these days. They’re available in a number of colors, fonts and sizes, and with a number of words, quotes and themes.  I absolutely love typographical art, and I’d dare say you can find something typographical in every room of our home.

And now it’s easier than ever to make your own. Did you know that both Walmart and Hobby Lobby are selling a plethora of blank wood signs and materials?

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I knew I wanted to incorporate the Bible verse Ruth 1:16-17 into our room somehow. We used this verse in our wedding ceremony, and we have it engraved in our wedding bands. It only seemed right to make signs with this verse for our room.

I have read about how you can create stencils using contact paper, so I decided to give it a try. I hopped on my computer and created a design.

silhouette art

I then sent it to the Silhouette machine and created a stencil, but I printed it backwards. #oops

oops

This is an easy problem to fix, though. You can either flip your design around in Design Space, or you can simply flip your contact paper over so that the writing is face down. That’s what I did.

correct stencil

This is my contact paper face down, with the stencil already cut. You can’t tell, though, so just take my word for it. Promise!

I finally cut out my stencil and popped my letters out. I affixed them to the boards, and filled in the stencils with white chalk paint.

stencil paint

I then allowed the paint to dry and then peeled the stencils off.

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I absolutely love how these turned out. They also ended up being absolutely perfect for the space.

What farmhouse sign projects are hiding up your sleeve?