A repurposed chair becomes a unique plant stand

A repurposed chair becomes a unique plant stand

Last year, my grandpa gave me this chair. He heard I was looking for an old chair and someone had given it to him.

I liked the look of the chair. It was a nice size and I thought it was a cute chair. I just wasn’t too sure about that metal woven seat. The metal was a little sharp and I was worried about my kids cutting their fingers.

So I removed it. I then painted the chair yellow.

I also used a little sandpaper to distress it a bit.

I first tried to use landscape mat to plant a vine plant, but it didn’t work.

So instead, I took some old wood planks and laid them across the bottom rungs of the chair.

I love how cute and unique this chair plant stand is. Plus, if I get tired of it, I can build a new seat for it.

But, the color brightens up our porch, and we get lots of compliments on our “fern chair.”

What have you repurposed lately?

Advertisements

Make it Monday: from Ikea tray to farmhouse art

Make it Monday: from Ikea tray to farmhouse art

Last year, my mom gave me this cute Ikea tray. I immediately loved the lace like pattern on the outer edges.

I used it as the base of an advent wreath, and for awhile, I used it in my coffee bar. I toyed with making a chalkboard out of it, but decided I wanted to create something a little less permanent.

I got the bright idea to create something using the Silhouette Cameo. Since I was a “noob” at the time and didn’t know what I was doing, some sweet friends of mine walked me through. Thanks, Katy, Kim, Leslie and anyone I may have forgotten 😉

I settled on a simple brush script font and a laurel wreath pattern. When I was done, I had this:

It’s cute, simple, and best of all, if I get tired of it, I can peel it off and do something different. What do you think?

What Silhouette or Cricut crafts have you done lately?

How to style your coffee table

How to style your coffee table

how to style coffee table

We have only recently gotten a coffee table. Our living room at the old house was too small for one, but in the four-and-a-half years we’ve lived here, we’ve never bought one. My first impulse was to buy one that matched our console table and end tables, but then I decided to buy one that coordinated with them instead. I wanted something a little on the cheap side, too, since the kids are still small.

I finally decided on an industrial farmhouse style coffee table with a second shelf for storing baskets.

12d27f1b-aba3-4e8d-a377-4c5768d94c04_1.aba7e2a9a8d0816a183f1a6d04bbe037.jpeg

{source}

Except now, what’s a girl to do with the top of the coffee table?

1. Anchor your collected items with a tray or shallow basket.

coffee table

I used this cute tray I bought in the Target Dollar Spot last summer. It is small, so it works perfectly for our small coffee table. I added some burlap-covered books for texture, a faux boxwood plant for greenery and height, and a candlestick for height, which brings me to my next tip.

2. Include natural elements for interest

I love the outdoors, and I love bringing a little nature into our home. What I also love is decorating with some sort of natural element, be it pinecones, florals, or greenery. The boxwood adds color and a little life to the table.

3. Height keeps the eye moving

Displaying your decor at different heights makes each item stand out, but it also keeps things interesting, since it draws the eyes to continue moving. Use a stack of books or a small stand to add height to a smaller object, or use pedastal dishes, candlesticks, or flower pots with a base.

4. Add a stack of books or magazines on the opposite side of the table to balance out the tray.

I chose to use two books, a recipe book about Sunday dinners, and a book about Labrador retrievers. I am a believer in decorating with things that make you happy. Sunday dinners evoke happy memories for me, and the Lab book is a nod to our “fur son,” a 12-year-old Yellow Lab named Bear.

living room 2

The bottom shelf houses a large basket for hiding unsightly but necessary things, like coasters and a spare blanket. The side opposite the basket holds a stack of magazines.

living room

I hope you’ve enjoyed these tips for decorating your coffee table. How is your coffee table decorated? Comment below with a picture- I’d love to see your coffee table!

Have a wonderful day.

Creating rustic bathroom shelves from plumbing pipes

Creating rustic bathroom shelves from plumbing pipes

make industrial farmhouse shelves

Our bathrooms in our home are very spacious, but they’re also very boring. They are both very plain and builder-grade. We’ve recently begun to look at them to see how we might add some character without spending a lot of money on them.

organized &shelfbathshowerjust for youbathroom vanity

We do eventually plan to replace the tubs, tub surround, and flooring, but that will be a costly renovation, and it just isn’t in the budget right now. Instead, we are comparison shopping and trying to decide just what we want when the time comes.

At the present time, though, we can add just a little farmhouse character to our baths without breaking our checkbook.

We have decided to add some sort of rustic shelving, swap out that builder grade mirror for a more farmhouse-styled one, maybe paint or re-stain the vanity, and upgrade that cheap light fixture, but until we do that, we’ve opted to add some rustic shelving. These are the shelves you’ve seen on Fixer Upper, and all over Pinterest. And they’re the perfect project for adding a little industrial farmhouse to your home.

Adding rustic shelving is super easy, and not that expensive. Here’s what you’ll need to get started to make two plumbing pipe shelves.

2X10 pine board

4 3/4 in galvanized pipe nipples

4 3/4 in floor flanges

4 3/4 in pipe caps

your choice wood stain (I used Minwax Walnut)

black spray paint

microfiber cloth

sandpaper/orbital sander

I didn’t take step by step pics of the prep work, because it’s monotonous and self-explanatory. First, measure the area where you want your shelves to hang. Once you know your needed dimensions, you can cut your board to the appropriate lengths. Remember to measure twice and cut once! Next, use sandpaper, or an orbital sander to sand your boards smooth. Afterward, wipe the sawdust from your boards with a microfiber cloth.Then, apply the wood stain using a rag or brush. Allow each coat to dry at least 24 hours. Using your black spray paint, paint the galvanized pipe parts black. Allow 24 hours to dry.  For best results, use a spray paint with a primer included.

 

After your boards have dried, measure the area once more you want to hang your shelves. Use a level to make sure your boards are level, and mark the wall where you’ll screw the floor flanges. I highly recommend hanging your shelves on a stud to make them more sturdy, but if you can’t, then you’ll need to use dry wall anchors.

floorflange

 

After you’ve screwed the flanges to the wall, then you can assemble the pipe nipples and caps.

shelf pipe

Repeat this step for each side of your shelves. Then, you simply lay your shelf boards attop the pipes, and you’re done!

2 pipe shelves

Yes, you can totally see where I filledi n the giant holes left behind by the towel bar. They were huge and required lots and lots of spackle.

But, here’s the (mostly) finished product.

organized & (1)

I love how these shelves add so much rustic charm and character to our bathroom…plus, they add some much needed storage. Our vanity in this bathroom is rather small and there isn’t much counter space.

Have you made any rustic pipe shelves lately? If so, I’d love for you to show me!

Have a wonderful week.

 

Make a tiered tray from stove eye covers

tiered trays

 It all started when I visited my aunt a few weeks ago. I casually mentioned wanting to make something from stove eye covers, but having a ceramic topped stove, I have not had stove eye covers for quite some time.
As luck would have it, my aunt had some stove eye covers she wanted to get rid of.
I gave those bad boys a coat of silver paint, got some cheap wooden candlesticks, and some all-purpose adhesive.
tiered tray needs
I then decided exactly where I wanted those candlesticks to be positioned, and I made it happen. You literally just glue the candlesticks to the eye covers- it’s that easy. Although, you may want to use some screws to secure the candlesticks and make the tray a little more stable.
candlestick tray
After the glue dried, I popped this little tiered tray into our hall bath and put it to good use!
organized &
I’m not done with this yet, but I love how it’s helping curb the clutter in our hall bath.  A versatile, cute tiered tray for very little money.
What have you repurposed lately?

 

How to use your vinyl cutter to create farmhouse wood signs

How to use your vinyl cutter to create farmhouse wood signs

Creating Pallet Signs

Wooden farmhouse signs are everywhere these days. They’re available in a number of colors, fonts and sizes, and with a number of words, quotes and themes.  I absolutely love typographical art, and I’d dare say you can find something typographical in every room of our home.

And now it’s easier than ever to make your own. Did you know that both Walmart and Hobby Lobby are selling a plethora of blank wood signs and materials?

IMG_6464.jpg

I knew I wanted to incorporate the Bible verse Ruth 1:16-17 into our room somehow. We used this verse in our wedding ceremony, and we have it engraved in our wedding bands. It only seemed right to make signs with this verse for our room.

I have read about how you can create stencils using contact paper, so I decided to give it a try. I hopped on my computer and created a design.

silhouette art

I then sent it to the Silhouette machine and created a stencil, but I printed it backwards. #oops

oops

This is an easy problem to fix, though. You can either flip your design around in Design Space, or you can simply flip your contact paper over so that the writing is face down. That’s what I did.

correct stencil

This is my contact paper face down, with the stencil already cut. You can’t tell, though, so just take my word for it. Promise!

I finally cut out my stencil and popped my letters out. I affixed them to the boards, and filled in the stencils with white chalk paint.

stencil paint

I then allowed the paint to dry and then peeled the stencils off.

IMG_6474.jpg

I absolutely love how these turned out. They also ended up being absolutely perfect for the space.

What farmhouse sign projects are hiding up your sleeve?