Creating a DIY Rustic Coat Rack

Creating a DIY Rustic Coat Rack

We had an awkward blank wall in our bedroom that was just begging for some rustic charm. I thought about buying a coat rack, but I couldn’t find what I wanted at the right price.

Then I found these super cute drawer knobs at Hobby Lobby. I loved the detail and “antique” look of them.

I immediately knew that I wanted to use them. I went to the garage and grabbed a scrap board. I stained it using Minwax Mohogany.

I then measured the board and marked where I wanted the knobs to go. Next, I drilled the holes.

I then inserted the knobs and screwed the bolts and washers to the board.

Now I no longer have an awkward, empty space, and a handy, cute new place to hang clothes.

What rustic DIY projects have you done lately?

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Decorating tips and tricks: decorating with botanical prints- a Pinterest roundup

Decorating tips and tricks: decorating with botanical prints- a Pinterest roundup

Botanical prints have long been a decorating staple, but due to the popularity of Joanna Gaines and HGTV’s Fixer Upper, their popularity has skyrocketed.

Botanical prints are a classic and simple way to decorate an empty wall, and you can use them in almost every room. We have a grouping of botanical prints in our dining room:

Here is a roundup of some of my favorite botanical wall decor from Pinterest.

This entry way from Bless’r House is simple, airy and beautiful. The simplicity of the botanical gallery wall only adds to the cozy and inviting feeling this room gives.

This French country inspired room at Hadley Court looks timeless and traditional without looking dated or stuffy.

How about this bathroom with these foliage prints on DecorPad? I like how they add just a subtle pop of color to this neutral bathroom.

This rustic farmhouse bedroom is plenty charming, but even more so due to the sweet botanical gallery above the bed.

Botanical galleries can be used in any room of your home, and they are readily available all over Pinterest for free! Just search “free botanical prints” and you can find whatever you need.

Where will you display your botanical prints?

*Due to the Good Friday and Easter holidays this weekend, we will resume our normal posting schedule on Monday, April 2. We hope you and your family have a wonderful Easter weekend.

Board and Batten farmhouse shutters: a ridiculously easy DIY

Board and Batten farmhouse shutters: a ridiculously easy DIY

Our kitchen had this awkward window above the sink, which looked into the dining room. It was random and weird, and I couldn’t decide what to do with it. I thought about putting a cafe rod and curtains there, but I really didn’t want to do that.

I wanted something more unique. I spotted some scrap wood in my garage and I had an idea: why not create some simple, rustic shutters? I measured the opening and cut the wood. Then, I bought some cute hinges and handles.

Here they are all laid out but not actually put together.

I constructed four shutters with crossbars like this:

I then painted them white, as you can see.

I attached the hinges on the insides of the shutters so I could accordion close them into the sides of the opening.

I absolutely love how much character these simple, rustic shutters add to our kitchen.

What rustic DIY have you recently created?

How to make faux vintage signs

How to make faux vintage signs

I really love those antique farmhouse style signs, but I don’t always love how much they cost.

Did you know there are websites chock full of vintage graphics that are royalty-free and copywrite free? One of my favorites is The Graphics Fairy. It was on that website that I not only discovered this super cool vintage print, but I also downloaded and printed it for free.

I decided to print it on card stock and glue it to a piece of foam core board. I had a piece of foam board I’d been using to cover my table when I painted wood letters. You can still see the green outline of a B from when I made our wreath last spring.

I then cut the foam board down to the size of the graphic.

This is an easy craft that didn’t cost me a thing! Plus, it’s cute and looks great on our bookshelf.

What cheap and easy farmhouse crafts have you done lately?

How a DIY closet organizer made a huge difference

How a DIY closet organizer made a huge difference

My daughters’ closets were one hot mess. Like most other closets in this house, There was only one rod and one really high shelf. I don’t have a before picture of my oldest daughter’s closet, but here’s my youngest’s closet. They both pretty much looked like this:

Ugh. I couldn’t find a thing and every time you opened the door, things would fall out. It was a big mess.

My dad, before he passed away, was a good carpenter. He never worked as a carpenter; he just happened to be pretty good at building things. I downloaded this Ana White plan, and he felt confident we could build it.

(AnaWhite.com)

I don’t know if you have ever used an Ana White plan before, but they are amazing. She includes a shopping list with everything you’ll need and even a cut list to tell you how to cut your boards. They’re really easy to follow. My dad built that closet organizer shelf in about two hours.

We added a double rod on only one side so that when the girls are older, they have one side to hang dresses.

I then took some old diaper boxes and covered them with fabric. I already had the baskets on the top shelf.

I then added labels to the boxes as well. I made them on our computer and then laminated them.

I also created labels for the bins in our youngest daughter’s closet.

Remember the closet that looked like this?

Well, now it looks like this:

Isn’t that so much better?

And best of all, we created both of these closets for less than $100.

Before you buy an expensive closet organizer, head on over to Anawhite.com and create your own…for a lot less.

Have a great day!

Make it Monday: from Ikea tray to farmhouse art

Make it Monday: from Ikea tray to farmhouse art

Last year, my mom gave me this cute Ikea tray. I immediately loved the lace like pattern on the outer edges.

I used it as the base of an advent wreath, and for awhile, I used it in my coffee bar. I toyed with making a chalkboard out of it, but decided I wanted to create something a little less permanent.

I got the bright idea to create something using the Silhouette Cameo. Since I was a “noob” at the time and didn’t know what I was doing, some sweet friends of mine walked me through. Thanks, Katy, Kim, Leslie and anyone I may have forgotten 😉

I settled on a simple brush script font and a laurel wreath pattern. When I was done, I had this:

It’s cute, simple, and best of all, if I get tired of it, I can peel it off and do something different. What do you think?

What Silhouette or Cricut crafts have you done lately?

Creating rustic bathroom shelves from plumbing pipes

Creating rustic bathroom shelves from plumbing pipes

make industrial farmhouse shelves

Our bathrooms in our home are very spacious, but they’re also very boring. They are both very plain and builder-grade. We’ve recently begun to look at them to see how we might add some character without spending a lot of money on them.

organized &shelfbathshowerjust for youbathroom vanity

We do eventually plan to replace the tubs, tub surround, and flooring, but that will be a costly renovation, and it just isn’t in the budget right now. Instead, we are comparison shopping and trying to decide just what we want when the time comes.

At the present time, though, we can add just a little farmhouse character to our baths without breaking our checkbook.

We have decided to add some sort of rustic shelving, swap out that builder grade mirror for a more farmhouse-styled one, maybe paint or re-stain the vanity, and upgrade that cheap light fixture, but until we do that, we’ve opted to add some rustic shelving. These are the shelves you’ve seen on Fixer Upper, and all over Pinterest. And they’re the perfect project for adding a little industrial farmhouse to your home.

Adding rustic shelving is super easy, and not that expensive. Here’s what you’ll need to get started to make two plumbing pipe shelves.

2X10 pine board

4 3/4 in galvanized pipe nipples

4 3/4 in floor flanges

4 3/4 in pipe caps

your choice wood stain (I used Minwax Walnut)

black spray paint

microfiber cloth

sandpaper/orbital sander

I didn’t take step by step pics of the prep work, because it’s monotonous and self-explanatory. First, measure the area where you want your shelves to hang. Once you know your needed dimensions, you can cut your board to the appropriate lengths. Remember to measure twice and cut once! Next, use sandpaper, or an orbital sander to sand your boards smooth. Afterward, wipe the sawdust from your boards with a microfiber cloth.Then, apply the wood stain using a rag or brush. Allow each coat to dry at least 24 hours. Using your black spray paint, paint the galvanized pipe parts black. Allow 24 hours to dry.  For best results, use a spray paint with a primer included.

 

After your boards have dried, measure the area once more you want to hang your shelves. Use a level to make sure your boards are level, and mark the wall where you’ll screw the floor flanges. I highly recommend hanging your shelves on a stud to make them more sturdy, but if you can’t, then you’ll need to use dry wall anchors.

floorflange

 

After you’ve screwed the flanges to the wall, then you can assemble the pipe nipples and caps.

shelf pipe

Repeat this step for each side of your shelves. Then, you simply lay your shelf boards attop the pipes, and you’re done!

2 pipe shelves

Yes, you can totally see where I filledi n the giant holes left behind by the towel bar. They were huge and required lots and lots of spackle.

But, here’s the (mostly) finished product.

organized & (1)

I love how these shelves add so much rustic charm and character to our bathroom…plus, they add some much needed storage. Our vanity in this bathroom is rather small and there isn’t much counter space.

Have you made any rustic pipe shelves lately? If so, I’d love for you to show me!

Have a wonderful week.